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Bond checks his watch (Goldfinger)

This 007 timeline is a comprehensive list of important dates in the history of the James Bond franchise and the real history behind it. It lists all the important events which have taken place from the character's inception in 1953 by writer Ian Fleming, to the present day.

Events are split into sections based on when they occurred, first by decade, then year and finally by month.


1900s

1908

1909

1910's

1915

1920's

1926

1927

1930's

1930

  • August 25: Sean Connery was born in Fountainbridge, Edinburgh, Scotland.

1939

  • May: Ian Fleming was recruited by Rear Admiral John Godfrey, Director of Naval Intelligence of the Royal Navy, to become his personal assistant.
  • September 5: George Lazenby was born in Goulburn, New South Wales, Australia.

1940's

1940

  • September 12: Operation Ruthless, a plan aimed at obtaining details of the Enigma codes used by Nazi Germany's navy, was instigated by a memo written by Fleming to Godfrey. 

1942

  • January 21: Michael G.Wilson was born in New York City, New York.
  • Fleming formed a unit of commandos, known as No. 30 Commando or 30 Assault Unit (30AU), composed of specialist intelligence troops.

1945

  • May: Fleming is demobilised and becomes the Foreign Manager in the Kemsley newspaper group, owners of The Sunday Times.[1] He works full-time for the paper until December 1959, but continues to write articles until at least 1961.[9]

1946

1950s

1952

  • February 15: To distract himself from his forthcoming nuptials, Fleming starts writing Casino Royale at his Goldeneye estate in Jamaica.[16]
  • March 18: Fleming finishes work on the script and shows it to an ex-girlfriend, Clare Blanchard, who advises him not to publish it at all, but that if he does so, it should be under another name.
  • March 24: Ian Fleming marries Lady Anne Rothermere in Port Maria's town hall, Jamaica.[16]
  • May 12: Fleming lunches with William Plomer of publisher Jonathan Cape to discuss his book.[16]
  • May 16: Future 007 actor, Pierce Brosnan, is born in Drogheda, County Louth, Republic of Ireland.[16]
  • July: Jonathan Cape Publishers agree to publish Casino Royale with the help of Peter Fleming, Ian's brother.[16]

1953

  • January: Fleming starts writing The Undertaker's Wind at Goldeneye, later changing the title to Live and Let Die.[16]
  • April 13: Fleming publishes his first novel, Casino Royale in London, establishing the character of James Bond. It was estimated that a copy sold out every six and a half minutes and by the end of May, the first print run had sold out.[16]
  • June: Fleming sails to the United States to sign North American publishing deal with Macmillan.[16]
  • October: British and American film studios show interest in the film rights to Casino Royale, but both deals fall through.[16]

1954

  • January: Ian Fleming starts writing Moonraker at Goldeneye.[16]
  • March 23: Casino Royale first published in the US by Macmillan.[16]
  • April 11: The Sunday Chronicle from Colombo, Ceylon attributes front page story to "James Bond".[16]
  • May: Hollywood producer Gregory Ratoff buys option to Casino Royale CBS Television buys TV rights to the novel.[16]
  • October 21: An hour-long television adaptation of Casino Royale is aired as an episode of CBS's dramatic anthology series Climax Mystery Theater.[16]

1955

  • January: Fleming starts writing Diamonds are Forever at Goldeneye.[16]
  • March: Hollywood producer Gregory Ratoff purchases full film rights to Casino Royale.[16]
  • April 7: Fleming's third novel, Moonraker, is published in the UK by Jonathan Cape.[16]
  • April: The first US paperback edition of Casino Royale published by Pocket Books under the title You Asked For It. Also, the first British paperback edition of Casino Royale published by Pan Books, selling 41,000 copies.[16]
  • Mid-September: Moonraker is published in the US.[16]
  • Mid-November: American actor John Payne and the Rank Organization battle for the film rights to Moonraker.[16]
  • December: The first spoof of James Bond, by John Russell, appears in the Christmas issue of The Spectator.[16]

1956

  • March: Actor John Payne quits negotiations for a film of Moonraker. Later, British actor Ian Hunter shows interest.
  • March 25: Raymond Chandler writes an admiring review of Fleming's Bond novels for The London Sunday Times.[16]
  • Summer: Fleming writes a treatment for a television series set in Jamaica with a hero named James Gunn and a villain called Dr. No.[16]
  • August: Fleming commissions artist Richard Chopping to paint the cover of From Russia, with Love.
  • December: Henry Morgenthau reports to Fleming that he's failed to sell the idea of a "James Gunn" TV series.[16]
  • December: The US paperback of Moonraker is published under the title Too Hot to Handle by Permabooks. This edition was rewritten to Americanise the British idioms used.[17]

1957

  • January: Fleming starts writing Dr. No at Goldeneye.[16]
  • April 8: The fifth Bond novel, From Russia, with Love, is published in the UK by Jonathan Cape.[16] Fleming toys with the idea of killing off the James Bond character, unsure of whether he should write another Bond novel or not.
  • April: Fleming meets with MI5 agent, John Collard, in Tangier to discuss efforts to stop African diamond smuggling. Later in September, The Sunday Times runs articles by Fleming on diamond smuggling.[16]


1958

  • February: Pan publishes paperback edition of Diamonds are Forever, selling 68,000 in 1958 (and 592,000 in 1964).[16]
  • March 31: Fleming's sixth novel, Dr. No, is published in the UK by Jonathan Cape.[16] The novel was originally a screenplay written in 1956 for what would have been a television show entitled Commander Jamaica. It marks the first appearance of both Major Boothroyd and Bond's signature weapon, the Walther PPK.
  • June 12: Fleming writes an outline for a Bond television series which becomes the premise of For Your Eyes Only.[16]
Ian Fleming and friends in Jamaica

Ian Fleming, Ann Fleming, Ivar Bryce and Robert Harling in Jamaica in the 1950s. © Ian Fleming Publications

  • Summer: Fleming and his friend, Ivar Bryce, begin talking about the possibility of a James Bond film. Irving Allen, Broccoli's partner in Warwick Films, meets with Fleming.[16]
  • Winter: Bryce introduces Fleming to a young Irish writer and director, Kevin McClory, and the three of them, together with Fleming and Bryce's friend Ernest Cuneo, form the partnership Xanadu Productions.[16]

1959

  • March 23: Goldfinger, the seventh novel in Ian Fleming's James Bond series is published in the UK by Jonathan Cape.
  • May: Fleming, Bryce, Cuneo and McClory come up with a story outline based on an aeroplane full of celebrities and a female lead called Fatima Blush. Over the next few months there are ten outlines, treatments and scripts.
  • July: Fleming writes a memo to Ernst Cuneo and Kevin McClory, creating the criminal organization SPECTRE.[16]
  • Late Summer: Fleming writes a film treatment including a stolen atomic bomb, and underwater battle and characters named Domino and Largo.[16]
  • October 21: Fleming writes a second film treatment called "James Bond of the Secret Service".[16]
  • December 21: After McClory brings in writer Jack Whittingham to work with Fleming, they meet in New York to begin a full-fledged screenplay which will be titled "Longitude 78 West" (or, later, "Thunderball").[16]

1960s

1960

  • American copies of Moonraker are reverted to the original title.
  • January 4: Fleming writes the novel Thunderball at Goldeneye, based on the film outlines developed with Whittingham and McClory.[16]
  • February: Pan publishes Dr. No paperback in the UK, selling 115,000 copies in 1960 (530,000 in 1964).[16]
  • April 11: A collection of short stories by Ian Fleming are published in the UK by Jonathan Cape under the title For Your Eyes Only.[16]
  • December: Harry Saltzman secures options on all existing and future Ian Fleming titles (except one).[16]

1961

  • March 17: In an article in LIFE Magazine, US President John F. Kennedy lists From Russia, with Love as number nine of his ten favourite books.[16]
  • March 27: Thunderball, the eighth novel in Ian Fleming's James Bond series is published in the UK by Jonathan Cape.[16] Notably, it introduces Bond's nemesis, Ernst Stavro Blofeld.
  • April 12: Days after a hearing to stop the publication of Thunderball, Fleming suffers a heart attack.[16]
  • May: Harry Saltzman is introduced to Albert R. "Cubby" Broccoli by a mutual friend, screenwriter Wolf Mankowitz.[16]
  • November: Broccoli and Saltzman sign Sean Connery for the role of James Bond.[16]

1962

  • January 16: Fifth and final draft of Dr. No screenplay revisions completed.[16]
  • January-March: Shooting begins in Jamaica on Dr. No. First shot - Bond in the phone booth at Kingston Airport.
  • April 16: The Spy Who Loved Me , the ninth novel in Ian Fleming's James Bond series is published. It is the shortest novel in the series, and is told from the first-person perspective of a woman named Vivienne Michel, rather than the third-person used in the other books.
  • Spring: Filming concludes on Dr. No after 58 days.[16]
  • March 30: Fleming involved in brief collaboration with TV producer that leads to series The Man from U.N.C.L.E.[16]

1963

  • April 1: On Her Majesty's Secret Service, the tenth novel in Ian Fleming's James Bond series is published. It is the first Fleming novel published after the release of the film Dr. No.
  • April 1-August 23: Shooting of From Russia with Love.[16]
  • May 9: Dr. No opens in the US.[16]
  • May: Pan publishes a second paperback edition of Thunderball in the UK, selling 808,000 copies during the course of the year.[16]
  • October 10: The film version of From Russia with Love opens at the London Palladium.[16] Notably, it is the first time the character of Ernst Stavro Blofeld appears on screen, with Desmond Llewelyn making his first appearance as Q.[16]
  • November 19: Ten-day court case ends after McClory takes Fleming to court over the publication of Thunderball, suing him for plagiarism. Fleming and Ivar Bryce agree to settle out of court.[16] McClory gains the literary and film rights for the screenplay, while Fleming is given the rights to the novel, although it has to be recognised as being "based on a screen treatment by Kevin McClory, Jack Whittingham and the Author".

1964

  • January-March: James Bond, the ornithologist whose name was used as Agent 007, visits Fleming at Goldeneye.[16]
  • March 16: You Only Live Twice, the eleventh novel (and twelfth book) in Ian Fleming's James Bond series of stories is published. It is the final Bond novel to be released in Fleming's lifetime.
  • August 12: Fleming dies at age 56 of a heart attack in Canterbury, Kent, England.[16]
NYC Times Square advertisement for Goldfinger (1964)

NYC Times Square advertisement for Goldfinger (1964).

  • September 17: The third Eon Productions film Goldfinger is premiered at the Odeon Leicester Square in London, with general release in the United Kingdom the following day.[18][16] The United States premiere occurs on 21 December 1964, at the DeMille Theatre in New York.[19] The film opened in 64 cinemas across 41 cities[20] and eventually peaked at 485 screens.[21]

1965

  • February-March: In France, stores sell $3 million in Bond merchandise during the French release of Goldfinger.[16]
  • April 5: Angie Dickenson presents the Oscar for Best Sound Effects to Norman Wanstall for Goldfinger.[16]
  • April 1: The Man with the Golden Gun, the twelfth novel (and thirteenth book) of Ian Fleming's James Bond series is posthumously published. It is the first and only novel published after Ian Fleming's death.
  • November: Playboy publishes a James Bond issue including a notorious interview with Sean Connery.[16]
  • February 16: Filming commences the fourth Eon Productions film Thunderball after producers Broccoli and Saltzman agree with McClory to cinematically adapt the novel. The joint production stops McClory from making any further versions of the novel for a period of ten years following the release of the Eon-produced version.
  • December 9: The fourth Eon Productions film Thunderball premieres in Tokyo, Japan and opens on 21 December in New York[16] and 29 December in London. Variety reported that Thunderball was the number-one money maker of 1966 at the North American box office by a large margin, with a net profit of $26,500,000.[22]

1966

  • April 18: At the Academy Awards ceremony, John Stears wins for Best Visual Effects for Thunderball.[16]
  • July 4: Filming begins on You Only Live Twice. On July 27th, fans mob Connery and Diane Cilento upon their arrival in Tokyo. That day at a press conference, Connery remarks that "Japanese women are just not sexy."[16]
  • October 7 & 14: Fleming;s biography is published in LIFE and The Life of Ian Fleming by John Pearson is published by McGraw-Hill.[16]
  • November 11: Donald Pleasence is brought in as Blofeld for You Only Live Twice at the last minute replacing Czech actor Jan Werich, who both Gilbert and Broccoli determine is not menacing enough – the official excuse being that Werich is ill.[23][16]

1967

  • April 11: You Only Live Twice opens in London at the Odeon, Leicester Square. It opens at the New York Astor on June 13th.[16]
  • April 13: The unofficial James Bond satire Casino Royale is released.
  • May 21: Roger Moore's long-running British television series, The Saint, debuts in America on NBC.[16]
  • July: Pan publishes paperback Octopussy in UK selling 79,000 copies in 1967 and 362,000 copies in 1968.[16]
  • October: Corgi toys releases the James Bond Toyota 2000GT from You Only Live Twice.[16]

1968

  • April: The search for a new 007 is narrowed to five candidates including: John Richardson, Anthony Rogers, Robert Campbell, Hans de Vries, and George Lazenby.[16]
  • September 5: Richard Maibaum completes shooting script for On Her Majesty's Secret Service.[16]
  • March 28: Colonel Sun - the first continuation James Bond novel published after the death of Ian Fleming - is published by Glidrose Productions and written by Kingsley Amis under the pen name of Robert Markham.
  • October 21: Shooting begins for On Her Majesty's Secret Service at a Swiss mountaintop restaurant staged as SPECTRE HQ, Piz Gloria.[16]

1969

  • June 23: On Her Majesty's Secret Service wraps up production, 58 days behind schedule.[16]
  • August 4: John Barry, Academy Award composer for previous Bond films, is signed by the producers Broccoli and Saltzman to score On Her Majesty's Secret Service.[16]
  • November: George Lazenby steps down from the role as James Bond following advice that the Bond series was outdated, and unresolved disputes with Broccoli and Saltzman.

1970s

1970

  • Winter: Corgi releases On Her Majesty's Secret Service toys including the Ford Escort, Mercury Cougar, Ford Capri, SPECTRE Mercedes and the James Bond bobsled.[16]
  • February 7: The LP soundtrack of On Her Majesty's Secret Service makes the charts, reaching #103.[16]
  • December: Guy Hamilton signed as director on next 007 installment Diamonds Are Forever.[16]

1971

  • February: Connery retakes role of Bond, replacing John Gavin and signs on with Eon Productions for more than $1 million of the total $7 million Diamonds Are Forever budget.[16]
  • February 24: Screenwriter Tom Mankiewicz completes first draft of the Diamonds Are Forever script.[16]
  • April: Connery makes a nine-week tour of the US filming Diamonds Are Forever before production moves to Pinewood Studios in England.[16]
  • August: Filming of Diamonds Are Forever wraps up.[16]
  • September: ABC's short-lived series The Persuaders debuts, starring Roger Moore and Tony Curtis with musical score by John Barry.[16]
  • December 14: The seventh film in the Eon Productions film franchise, Diamonds Are Forever, has its UK premiere at the Odeon Leicester Square. It grossed $116 million worldwide,[26] of which $43 million was from the United States.[27]

1972

  • January: John Brosnan's James Bond in the Cinema is published in the US by Tantivy Press.[16]
  • January: United Artists sells television rights for the 007 films to ABC for an unprecedented sum of $17 million.[16]
  • July 4: British playwright and screenwriter Jack Whittingham dies of a heart attack in Valletta, Malta.[28]
  • September 17: ABC-TV airs network premiere of Goldfinger, the first televised Eon Productions James Bond film, and gains a 49-point share and a 31.1 rating - a record as one of the most-watched programs in television history.[16]

1973

  • June 27: The release of Live and Let Die in the United States; the eighth film in the James Bond film series, and the first to star Roger Moore as Bond. The world premiere was at Odeon Leicester Square in London on 6 July 1973, with general release in the United Kingdom on the same day.[29]
  • July 7: Fawcett Gold Medal paperbacks publishes Roger Moore's James Bond Diary.[16]
  • November 6: Shooting begins for The Man with the Golden Gun, at Hong Kong harbor with ocean liner wreck.[16]

1974

  • January: Richard Schenkman and Bob Forlini start the first ever James Bond fan club in Yonkers, New York. Their first newsletter Bondage is published.[16]
  • June 24: Crew of The Man with the Golden Gun return to Pinewood Studios to begin eight weeks of interiors.[16]
  • November 10: ABC-TV airs the network premiere of Dr. No.[16]
  • December 19: The ninth official James Bond film The Man with the Golden Gun is premiered at the Odeon Leicester Square in London,[30] with general release in the United Kingdom the same day. The film was made with an estimated budget of $7 million; despite initial good returns from the box office,[31] The Man with the Golden Gun grossed a total of $97.6 million at the worldwide box office,[32] with $21 million earned in the USA, making it the fourth lowest-grossing Bond film in the series.[33]

1975

  • October 2: Ian Fleming's troubled son, Caspar, dies of a suicidal drug overdose.[16]
  • December: After suffering troubling financial disputes, his wife's diagnosis of terminal cancer, and depression, producer Harry Saltzman sells United Artists his 50% stake in Danjaq, LLC, the parent company of Eon Productions, for £20 million.[16]
  • Kevin McClory first announces that he is remaking Thunderball under the title Warhead. The concept would remain in limbo before eventually being replaced by the Never Say Never Again project.
  • December 11: British-American Chamber of Commerce honors Roger Moore as Man of the Year.[16]

1976

  • July: Production of The Spy Who Loved Me begins on location at Auqituq National Park in Canada, Sardinia, and the Great Pyramids of Egypt.[16]
  • December 5: The 007 Stage - one of the largest silent stages in the world - is officially opened at Pinewood Studios in a ceremony attended by former British Prime Minister, Harold Wilson. ABC-TV airs the network premiere of Diamonds are Forever.[16]

1977

  • June: Playboy features Barbara Bach in a pictorial entitled "Bonded Barbara".[16]
  • July 23: Nobody Does It Better, the title song from The Spy Who Loved Me, hits the charts eventually reaching #2. On August 27th, the LP soundtrack of The Spy Who Loved Me hits the charts eventually reaching #40.[16]
  • Winter: British sales of the British Pan Bond paperback editions hit 27,863,500 copies.[16]
  • December: BBC-TV broadcasts a four-part series on the filming of The Spy Who Loved Me.[16]
  • July 7: The Spy Who Loved Me, the tenth official James Bond film and the first to be made without Harry Saltzman, opens with a Royal Premiere attended by Princess Anne at the Odeon Leicester Square. It grossed $185.4 million worldwide,[34] with $46 million in the United States alone.[35] On 25 August 2006, the film was re-released at the Empire Leicester Square Cinema for one week.[36]

1978

  • March 29: The Best Song Nominee Nobody Does It Better is performed by Aretha Franklin on the Academy Awards telecast.[16]
  • August 14: Moonraker begins filming in France.[16]
  • Winter: Former-Bond George Lazenby appears in a Sony commercial as a 007-ish "Secret Agent" meeting a "Q"-like character.[16]

1979

  • February 27: Principle photography for Moonraker finishes in France.[16]
  • June 25-30: The Museum of Modern Art in New York shows a James Bond exhibit.[16]
  • June 26: The premiere of the eleventh official James Bond film Moonraker, in the Odeon Leicester Square, United Kingdom; grossing $70,308,099 in the UK. Three days after the UK release, it went on general release in the US, opening in 788 cinemas. On mainland Europe, the most common month of release was in August 1979. Given that the film was produced largely in France, and it involved some notable French actors, the French premiere for the film was relatively late, released in that country on 10 October 1979. Moonraker grossed a worldwide total of $210,300,000.[37]
  • July: Playboy profiles the James Bond character in a cover story devoted to "The Girls of James Bond".[16]

1980s

1980

  • April 14: Moonraker is nominated for Best Visual Effects at the Academy Awards.[16]
  • July 6: Roger Moore, angry over secret tests of other actors, states categorically that he will not play Bond again.[16]
  • Autumn: 24-year-old Ross Hendry of Harrow, Middlesex, founds the James Bond British Fan Club.[16]
  • September 2: Production of For Your Eyes Only begins in the North Sea, with three days shooting exterior scenes with the St. Georges.[39][40]
  • September: Steven Jay Rubin's The James Bond Films is published.[16]
  • Late 1980: Playboy and United Artists sponsor Bond Girl contest. The winner Robbin Young appears in For Your Eyes Only.[16]

1981

  • January 1: Production of For Your Eyes Only moves to Cortina d'Ampezzo in Italy, where filming wraps in February.[39] Since it is not snowing at the time of filming, the producers pay for trucks to bring snow from nearby mountains, which is then dumped in the city's streets.[41]
  • January 7: RCA Selectavision buys the laser-disc rights to the 007 films for $1.5 million.[16]
  • January 16: After being admitted in November 1980 to the Royal Free Hospital in London, suffering from stomach cancer, actor Bernard Lee dies.[42] Consequently, the upcoming For Your Eyes Only will be the first and only 007 film without the character M.
  • Summer: Film historian Jim Schoenberger discovers kinescope of CBS "Climax!" broadcast of Casino Royale.[16]
  • June 24: Premiere of the twelfth official James Bond film For Your Eyes Only at the Odeon Leicester Square in London,[43][16] setting an all-time opening-day record for any film at any cinema in the UK with a gross of £14,998[44]. The film went on general release in the UK the same day. For Your Eyes Only had its North American premiere in Canada and the US on Friday 26 June, at approximately 1,100 cinemas.[44]
  • November 22: ABC-TV broadcasts Moonraker for the first time on free television in the US.[16]
  • After his previous failure to begin production of Warhead, Kevin McClory finds a production company set up by a top Hollywood lawyer and announces a new project. Again, it would be a remake of Thunderball starring Sean Connery. It would become Never Say Never Again.

1982

1983

  • April: John Gardner's 007 continuation novel, Icebreaker, is published in the US with a UK release in the summer.[16]
  • April 5: George Lazenby appears as a "Bondesque" character, complete with gadget-equipped Aston Martin DB5 (with 'JB' plates), in the CBS-TV broadcast of The Return of the Man From U.N.C.L.E.[16]
  • September 13: In the US, Victory Games introduces a series of James Bond, 007 role-playing games.[16]
  • October 5: A newly discovered asteroid is named 9007 James Bond in honour of Ian Fleming.
  • October 7: The unofficial James Bond film and remake of the 1965 film Thunderball - Never Say Never Again - is released by Warner Bros.
  • October 8: Author Steve Rubin hosts the "007 Master Trivia Marathon" at a theater complex near Los Angeles.[16]
  • A side-scrolling video game titled James Bond 007 is developed and published by Parker Brothers for the Atari 2600, Atari 5200, ColecoVision, and Commodore 64.

1984

  • Spring: John Gardner's third Bond continuation novel Role of Honour is published in the US by Putnam and in the UK by Jonathan Cape.[16]
  • June 20: Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson complete screenplay for A View to a Kill. The script undergoes eleven revisions.[16]
  • June 27: The 007 Stage is burnt to the ground towards the end of filming of Ridley Scott's Legend.[16]
  • Mid-August: Production begins on A View to a Kill.[16]

1985

  • May 25: "The James Bond 007 Master Trivia Tournament" is held at AMC Puente 10 Theatres in Industry, California.[16]
  • June 13: Roger Moore and Producer Albert R. Broccoli meet and mutually agree that it is time for a younger actor to take over from the 58 year old veteran.[49] Broccoli, however, claims that he let Moore go from the role.[50]
  • June 29: Soundtrack from A View To A Kill makes the record charts, eventually reaching #33. [16]
  • Autumn: Following the financial[50] and critical disappointment of A View to a Kill, work begins on scripts for Bond 15.
  • November 26: Variety reports that Roger Moore has notified Cubby Broccoli that he will not be returning as James Bond.[16]
  • December 3: Roger Moore officially announces his retirement from the role after 12 years and 7 films.[51]

1986

People Magazine, August 11 1986

People Magazine, August 11 1986

  • Spring: After an extensive search for a new actor to play Bond (involving auditions by New Zealander Sam Neill, Irish-born Pierce Brosnan and Welshman Timothy Dalton) the producers eventually offer the role to Brosnan after a three-day screen-test.[52] No formal announcement was made by the Bond producers.
  • May 17: Moore is awarded Friars' Man of the Year with Frank Sinatra as toast-master and Dean Martin and Cary Grant participating.[16]
  • July 15: Due to the publicity Brosnan is receiving as the heir-apparent to the license to kill, television network NBC exercises a 60-day option in his contract to make a further season of the recently cancelled show Remington Steele.[53][54] Brosnan, with his 7-year contract, is obligated to return to the show.[55]
  • August 6: Bond producer Albert Broccoli withdraws the offer given to Brosnan, citing that he does not want the character associated with a contemporary TV series.[55][56] Timothy Dalton, whose name has never been publicly mentioned as a contender prior to late July, is publicly named the 4th James Bond on August 7th.[16] Shooting on The Living Daylights is consequently postponed to late September.
  • September 29: The Living Daylights begins filming.[16]
  • December 11: Royal dignitaries Prince Charles and Princess Diana visit the set of The Living Daylights to meet the new James Bond, Timothy Dalton.
  • The text-based video game James Bond 007: Goldfinger (based on the 1964 film) developed by Angelsoft and published by Minscape. is released for the PC, Macintosh, and Apple II platforms.

1987

  • February 13: Production wraps on The Living Daylights.[16]
  • April: Esquire publishes an interview with Sean Connery titled, "So... we meet at last, Mr. Bond: an encounter with Sean Connery."[16]
  • June 5-July 23: New York Museum of Modern Art holds 007 exhibition, with screenings of fourteen Bond films.[16]
  • June 29: The 15th official James Bond film (and the first to feature Timothy Dalton as 007) The Living Daylights is premiered at the Odeon Leicester Square in London, with Prince Charles and Diana, Princess of Wales in attendance.[57] The film was released in the US on July 31[16] and grossed the equivalent of $191.2 million worldwide.[58] In the United States it earned $51,185,000,[59] including an opening weekend of $11,051,284.[60]
  • August 29: Retired 007 actor, Roger Moore hosts Happy Anniversary 007: 25 Years of James Bond, an hour-long television documentary on the history of Bond for the 25th anniversary of the film series.[61]
  • September: Playboy has a cover feature "The Women of James Bond," with an accompanying Maryam d'Abo pictorial.[16]
  • September: Publisher Domark Software releases the platform game The Living Daylights (based on the eponymous film) for Amiga, Amstrad CPC, Amstrad PCW, Atari 8-bit, BBC Micro, Commodore 64, MSX, and ZX Spectrum platforms.[62][63]
  • December 9: Connery is interviewed on US television by ABC-TV's Barbara Walters, discussing his reasons for leaving the role of 007.[16]

1988

  • January 24: A second 007-style Diet Coke® commercial starring Pierce Brosnan airs during Super Bowl XXII, with Brosnan fighting ninjas on a train.[16]
  • March 11: Sean Connery opens the Academy Awards with the phrase "The name is Connery, Sean Connery." Later that evening he receives the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for The Untouchables.[16]
  • April 13: Roger Moore attends the unveiling of a Bond statuette in his image at Movieland Wax Museum in Buena Park, California.[16]
  • May 5: Michael G. Wilson completes the script of Licence to Kill "from a story by Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson."[16]
  • May: John Gardner's eighth James Bond continuation novel, Scorpius, is published in the US by G.P. Putnam's Sons.[16]
  • July 18: Shooting begins on Licence to Kill in Mexico City's Churubusco Studios.[16]
  • The speedboat racing game Live and Let Die (based on the 1973 film) is released for Amiga, Atari ST, Amstrad CPC, Commodore 64, MS-DOS, and ZX Spectrum platforms. It is developed by Elite Systems International and published by Domark Software.[64]

1989

  • February 14: Ornithologist James Bond, after whom Ian Fleming named the character, died.[16]
  • March 29: At the Academy Awards telecast, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor was presented by Sean Connery, Michael Caine, and Roger Moore.[16]
  • April 20: The top-down shooter game Licence to Kill (based on the upcoming film) is released for a variety of contemporary platforms, developed by Quixel and published by Domark Software.
  • June 13: The 16th official James Bond film Licence to Kill premiered at the Odeon Leicester Square in London[65] and opened in the US on July 14th. The film grossed a total of £7.5 million in the UK,[66] with $156 million taken worldwide.[67] US cinema returns were $34.6 million,[67] making Licence to Kill the least financially successful 007 film in the US, when accounting for inflation.[68] It would be Timothy Dalton's second and final portrayal of James Bond.
  • July: John Gardner's ninth continuation novel Win, Lose or Die is published in the Us by G.P. Putnam's Sons.[16]
  • December 16: Sixty-year-old Sean Connery is voted the "Sexiest Man Alive" by People Magazine.[16]
  • Winter: Dalton suggests Broccoli donate Licence to Kill cigarette lighter to charity. The bidding rises to £3000.[16]

1990s

1990

3305257 orig

Bond 17 promotional material on The Carlton Hotel, during the 1990 Cannes Film Festival.

  • May 5: The 25th Anniversary of the release of Thunderball was celebrated in London by the James Bond 007 Fan Club.[16]
  • July: John Gardner's 10th continuation novel, Brokenclaw, is published in the US by G.P. Putnam's Sons.[16]
  • August: Veteran screenwriter Richard Maibaum and director John Glen leave Eon Productions on 'amicable' terms amid trade press reports of a "bloodless coup".[69]
  • Production on the 17 Bond picture begins, Alfonse M. Ruggiero produces a 17-page draft.[70]
  • MGM/UA is sold to Pathé Communications. Danjaq, the Swiss based parent company of Eon, sues MGM/UA and its new chairman to protect the TV distribution rights of the series from being devalued. These legal disputes engendered a several year hiatus in the series.
  • The top-down shooter game The Spy Who Loved Me (an adaptation of the 1977 film) is released for a variety of contemporary platforms, developed by The Kremlin and published by Domark.

1991

  • March: Turner Broadcasting airs Diamonds Are Forever gaining the largest movie audience in basic cable history after acquiring the exclusive US television rights to the James Bond film library.[16]
  • August 8: Roger Moore appointed UNICEF's special representative for the film arts.[16]
  • August 24, 31: BBC Radio 2 airs a two-part special spotlighting John Barry.[16]
  • 30 September: Debut of the spin-off animated television series James Bond Jr. which followed the adventures of Bond's nephew. It would run until 2 March 1992 with a total of 65 half-hour episodes produced.
  • Autumn: The Ian Fleming Foundation is founded and dedicated to restoring, archiving and preserving Ian Fleming's legacy.[16]

1992

  • June: John Gardner's twelfth continuation novel, Death is Forever, is published by G.P. Putnam's Sons.[16]
  • December 10: MGM/UA lawsuits delaying the production of further Bond films are settled after key executives leave MGM and Credit Lyonnais helps finance the studio out of debt.[16] As the legal debates draw to a close and in 1993 a more "Bond-friendly" view is taken by the execs.[70]

1993

  • March 1: Dark Horse Comics publishes a second Bond comic. A Silent Armageddon, by Simon Jowett and John M. Burns.[16] In addition, the story Light of My Death by Das Petrou and John Watkiss appears in Dark Horse Comics #8-11.[75]
  • April: Michael France, writer of action hit Cliffhanger is hired to write the next James Bond film. In the May 13th issue of Variety, MGM creative affairs VP Elizabeth Robinson announces that work on the 17th 007 movie has resumed with writer Michael France writing a fresh script for the as-yet-untitled Bond XVII.[70][16]
  • April 21: TBS inaugurates "James Bond Wednesday" offering a different 007 double feature every Wednesday.[16]
  • June 17: Corgi Toys sponsors the second tour, "The World's Biggest Little Motor Show," displaying full-sized and model scale versions of various 007 vehicles.[16]
  • August: France turns in a second draft for Bond 17.[70]
  • September 11: TV Guide, touts Timothy Dalton's appearance in the television film "Framed", quoting him as saying that he will be in the next upcoming Bond film.[16]
  • December: Sean Connery flies on to the set of CBS's Late Night with David Letterman with a jet pack, ala Thunderball.[16]

1994

  • June 1: Dark Horse Comics issues its first installment of their comic Shattered Helix, by Simon Jowett, David Jackson and David Lloyd.[77]
  • January: Michael France finishes the first draft of Bond XVII, now named GoldenEye.[16]
  • April 11: On the set of American television miniseries Scarlett, Timothy Dalton formally announces his resignation from the role of James Bond.[55]
  • June 8: In a press conference at the Drawing Room of London's Regent's Hotel, Pierce Brosnan is introduced to the world as the new 007.[16]
  • Dark Horse Comics publishes the story Minute of Midnight by Doug Moench and Russ Heath in Dark Horse Comics #25.[78]
  • September: After two weeks' work, screenwriter Kevin Wade leaves GoldenEye.[16]
  • September 7: Terence Young, director of Dr. No, From Russia with Love and Thunderball, dies in Cannes, France at age 79.[16]
  • September 29: 007 producer Harry Saltzman and past partner to Albert R. Broccoli at EON Productions, dies at the American Hotel in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France.[16]
  • October 28: A 30th anniversary screening of Goldfinger is shown at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills.[16]
  • November: A small staff travels to Peurto Rico to shoot wide shots and aerial footage for GoldenEye.[16]

1995

  • January 1: Dark Horse Comics issues the first installment of their final 007 comic The Quasimodo Gambit, by Don McGregor and Gary Caldwell.[79]
  • January: Production begins on Bond 17 at Leavesdon Studios (then EON Studios).[70]

1997

  • October 13: Kevin McClory and Sony Pictures Entertainment Company (SPE) announce their intention to remake Thunderball for a second time. The rumored title would be Warhead 2000.

1998

1999

  • March 30: Kevin McClory's Warhead 2000 AD project is officially terminated after Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer obtains the film rights to Casino Royale from Sony Pictures Entertainment for $10 million in the out-of-court settlement of a law suit.
  • November 16: North American release of Tomorrow Never Dies, a third-person shooter stealth video game based on the 1997 film of the same name. Developed by Black Ops Entertainment and published by Electronic Arts, it was released exclusively for the Sony PlayStation.
  • November 19: The World Is Not Enough, the 19th film in the official James Bond series, is released in the USA.
  • August 17: Q actor Desmond Llewelyn launches the James Bond 007: A License To Thrill simulator ride (now named 007: Licence to Thrill) at the London Trocadero at Piccadilly Circus.[81][80]
  • December 1: The final location of the James Bond 007: A License To Thrill attraction opens Fox Studios Australia in Sydney, now named 007: License to Thrill.[80]

2000s

2000

  • November 20: North American release of 007 Racing, a third-person racing video game developed by Eutechnyx and published by Electronic Arts for the PlayStation video game console.

2001

2002

2003

  • Release of 007 Hover Chase, a racing video game developed by IOMO and published by Vodafone for mobile phones. Based on the pre-title hovercraft action sequence from the 2002 film Die Another Day.

2004

2005

  • June 21: The quote "Bond. James Bond," is declared as the 22nd greatest film quote of all time by the American Film Institute.
Daniel Craig London press conference (October 14 2005)

Daniel Craig arrives at a reveal press conference in London by speedboat (October 14 2005).

  • October 14: After considering more than 200 actors from around the world for over two years, Eon Productions officially name Daniel Craig as the sixth actor to portray 007, taking over from Pierce Brosnan. The actor arrives at a press conference in London by speedboat.[83]
  • Sony leads a consortium that purchases MGM, allowing Sony to gain distribution rights starting with the 2006 film Casino Royale.[85]

2006

3663323351 08227a17af o
  • January 3: Principal photography for Casino Royale commences and concludes on 20 July 2006. The film is primarily shot at Barrandov Studios in Prague, with additional location shooting in the Bahamas, Italy and the UK. The shoot concludes at Pinewood Studios.[86]
  • November 14: The twenty first official film, Casino Royale, is released starring Daniel Craig as 007. This version is a reboot the film series, establishing a new timeline and narrative framework not meant to precede or succeed any previous Bond film.[87][88] However, it is still remains a part of the official Bond film franchise produced by Eon Productions.[89]
  • November 20: Kevin O'Donovan McClory, screenwriter and film producer, dies in London.[8]

2007

2008

  • October 2: A graphic novel adaptation of SilverFin written by Charlie Higson and illustrated by artist Kev Walker is released by Puffin Books in the UK [92] and by Disney Hyperion in the US on 18 May 2010.[93]

2010s

2010

  • Skyfall, then known by the working title Bond 23, was suspended throughout 2010 because of MGM's financial troubles.
  • December 21: Bond 23 resumes pre-production.

2011

2012

  • April 17: Online retailer Amazon announces that it has purchased the North American rights to Ian Fleming's James Bond books.[95]
  • July 6: Designing 007 – Fifty Years of Bond Style opens at the Barbican Centre in London and runs until 5 September 2012, before travelling to other cities including Dubai, Paris, Mexico City, Madrid, Rotterdam, Moscow, Melbourne, Shanghai and Toronto.[96][97]
  • October 5: 50th anniversary charity auction of Bond memorabilia from the archives of EON Productions plus donations from Bond cast members held at Christie’s, London. An online-only auction ran from September 28th to October 8th.[98]
Bond-1-craig 2377158k

Daniel Craig attends the premiere of Skyfall at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

  • October 23: Skyfall is premiered at the Royal Albert Hall in London, becoming the twenty third official James Bond film. The event was attended by Charles, Prince of Wales, and his wife Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall.[99] The film was released in the UK three days later on 26 October and into US cinemas on 8 November.[100]

2013

  • January 4: Activision and Steam's online stores quietly remove online copies and pages for Quantum of Solace, Blood Stone, and 007 Legends without explanation or warning.
  • February 20: Activision confirms that it will be backing away from licensed games.[102]

2014

  • November 6: Shoot to Kill, sixth novel in the Young Bond series and first by Steve Cole, is published in the UK by Random House.[106]

2015

574db985-dde0-47e2-9f27-9b99ff893826
  • October 7: While promoting Spectre, actor Daniel Craig voices frustration in an interview with Timeout magazine. Asked whether he will make another Bond film, Craig replies "I'd rather break this glass and slash my wrists" and notes that if he did another movie it "would only be for the money."[107]
  • October 26: Spectre has its official premier at the Royal Albert Hall in London. It becomes the twenty fourth James Bond film.
  • Following the 2015 release of Spectre, Sony Pictures Entertainment's contract to market and distribute the James Bond films expires. Reportedly, Sony, Warner Bros, Annapurna, Fox and Universal are all pursuing distribution rights to the franchise, valued at between $2bn and $5bn (£1.5bn-£3.8bn), according to Hollywood Reporter.[108][109]
  • November 4: The first issue of Dynamite Entertainment's comic VARGR is published, coinciding with the release of Spectre.[104] It is the 69th best selling issue of the month with estimated orders of 35,600.[110]

2016

  • December 30: Glu Mobile shuts down the James Bond: World of Espionage servers.
  • June 21: Dynamite releases a hardcover collection of the first six issues of VARGR[111] and publishes the first chapter of Ellis and Masters' follow-up story, Eidolon as issue #7.[112]
  • October: Dynamite publishes Hammerhead, a six-issue comic miniseries, bringing new creators Andy Diggle as the writer and Luca Casalanguida as the artist on board.[113]

2017

  • July 24: Official announcement of Bond 25 with an intended US release date of November 8, 2019 with traditional earlier releases in the UK etc. Writers Neal Purvis and Robert Wade are announced to be returning, along with producers Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli.[117]
  • July: Dynamite publishes the first issue of their follow-up to the Hammerhead comic-book miniseries titled Kill Chain and created by the same team who wrote and illustrated its predecessor.[118]
  • August: Dynamite publishes the first issue of a spin-off comic-book miniseries titled Moneypenny, which centers on M's secretary and security agent, Moneypenny herself, written by Jody Houser and illustrated by Jacob Edgar.[119]
The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, August 15 2017

Daniel Craig confirms his return to the role, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, August 15th 2017.

  • August 15: Speaking on American talk show The Late Show with Stephen Colbert actor Daniel Craig ends speculation and confirms he will play the Bond for a fifth and final time. Craig’s renewed enthusiasm for the role marks a change of mind after comments he made in 2015, which he explained as the product of exhaustion.[120]
  • November: Dynamite publishes a one-shot Bond comic written and illustrated by Ibrahim Moustafa, titled Solstice.[121]

2018

  • January 17: Dynamite publishes the first issue of its fourth comic-book story in its monthly series entitled The Body. It is written by Ales Kot, with Luca Casalanguida working on the art for the third time in the Bond comic series.[122]

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