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Victor-III class submarine

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TWINE - Victor-III submarine crashes

Victor-III class submarine nose-dives, as seen in The World Is Not Enough (1999).

The Victor-III class is the NATO reporting name for a type of nuclear-powered submarine that was put into service by the Soviet Union in 1979; 25 were produced until 1991.[1] The vessel was primarily designed to protect Soviet surface fleets and to attack American ballistic missile submarines. A depiction of a Victor class submarine was used prominently in the 1999 James Bond film The World Is Not Enough as a key element in the film's antagonists' plan.

Real-world background

As with other members of the Victor-class, the Victor-III featured a teardrop shape, which allowed it to travel at high speed. Quieter than previous Soviet submarines, these ships had 4 tubes for launching SS-N-21 or SS-N-15 missiles and Type 53 torpedoes, plus another 2 tubes for launching SS-N-16 missiles and Type 65 torpedoes. 24 tube-launched weapons or 36 mines could be on board. The Victor-III caused a minor furore in NATO intelligence agencies at its introduction because of the distinctive pod on the vertical stern-plane. Speculation immediately mounted that the pod was the housing for some sort of exotic silent propulsion system, possibly a magnetohydrodynamic drive unit. Another theory proposed that it was some sort of weapon system. In the end, the Victor-III's pod was identified as a hydrodynamic housing for a reelable towed passive sonar array; the system was subsequently incorporated into the Sierra class and and Akula-class submarine SSNs. The Victor III class was continuously improved during construction and late production models have a superior acoustic performance.[2] They were 106m long. 21 disposed.[3]

Film appearance

Images

References

  1. Submarines of the Russian and Soviet Navies 1718-1990, Norman Polmar and Jurrien Noot, Naval Institute Press, 1991
  2. Run Silent, Run Deep - Navy Ships
  3. 671 (). Retrieved on 19 December 2014.

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